The name of this web site, Nonviolent Cow (formerly “Nonviolent Worm”), brings together two forces I have experienced in my life: the wonder and power of creation, and the wonder and power of the Spirit, or creative nonviolence.
On the right sidebar you will find links related to the Power of Nonviolence, represented by the word nonviolent, and on the left sidebar you will find links related to the Power of Growing, represented by the word cow.


Below you will find links to the Diary of a Worm, Nonviolence, Featured Articles, quotes, art, jokes plus much more in observations, information and reflections. Check our Wonderful Links to find links to other related sites. Enjoy and take what you want and need. All is free as all shall be well.
Bob Graf


Story of Struggle for Milwaukee SVDP

Mission of Society of St. Vincent de Paul is to lead “women and men to join together to grow spiritually by offering person-to-person service to those who are needy and suffering.” “Serving Christ’s needy is the primary goal of all St. Vincent De Paul Stores.” The Greenfield store is costing millions of dollars of donations and items given to the poor and not serving the members of Society or the poor and marginalized.

Diary of a Worm

Journal of daily reflections on the progress of my home-based agriculture experiments, mixed with observations about life, peace, justice, faith, family, community and friends.

Jesus, Good for Nothing Old, White Guy? - Friday, February 12, 2016



When I was writing the lyrics for my country song title ”I am an good for nothing old white guy” I came across a picture of Jesus with the words “The Only White Guy in Ancient Middle East.” Now if you take away the cigarette butt handing from his mouth this looks like a picture of Jesus, at least the one I remember from my childhood in a Catholic school. Now being a third generation Middle Eastern on my grandfather’s side I know that people of Jesus had darker skin but Jesus is presented as a white guy.

Now let’s say the pictures are right and Jesus was a ‘white guy’ that does not make him an old white guy. Wait, he left home at 30 years old and died when he was 33 years old. That seems young but when you consider the average age of men in these times was 40 Jesus was not that young. If he was an old white guy you can say he was not a “good for nothing” old white guy.

Wait again! While we look at Jesus as our great savior, people of his time had another view. People like the miracles and some of the preaching but often treated him like a ‘reject’. Look at the crowd in the village of Nazareth when return to where he had grown up. They took him up a hill to throw him off. When he was arrested in his last days everyone left him.

Yes, Maybe Jesus was a good for nothing only white guy.


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See the full list of articles in the Diary of a Worm.

Quotes

Quotes from Mahatma Gandhi

First they ignore you

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.”

Nonviolent Jesus

“Everyone in the world knows that Jesus and His teachings were nonviolent except Christians.” M. Gandhi

Quotes from Dorothy Day


A Biography of Dorthy Day by Jim Forest

Letter from Dorthy Day prime directive of Gospel

On Lent

In general, in the first flush of Lent, the struggle is undertaken bravely. What if during the long weeks the fervor lessens and the work of accumulating graces was continued with many lapses, but by effort of will. That time when will has to be brought into play is perhaps the most important of all, despite failures and the total lack of a sense of accomplishment, of growth. Fervor comes again with Holy Week, joy comes on the day of resurrection, with all nature singing exultantly God’s praises.
To keep united to God through the suffering Humanity of His son—that is the aim of Lent. — Dorothy Day from her column “Day After Day”, The Catholic Worker, April 1935

People Need to be Distrubed.

“When it is said that we disturb people too much by the words pacifism and anarchism, I can only think that people need to be disturbed, that their consciences need to be aroused, that they do indeed need to look into their work, and study new techniques of love and poverty and suffering for each other. Of course the remedies are drastic, but then too the evil is a terrible one and we are all involved, we are all guilty, and most certainly we are all going to suffer. The fact that we have “the faith,” that we go to the sacraments, is not enough. ‘Inasmuch as ye have done it unto the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me’ with napalm, nerve gas, our hydrogen bomb, our ‘new look’.” (“Are The Leaders Insane?” By Dorothy Day, The Catholic Worker, April 1954, 1, 6.}

Everyday Chores

“Paper work, cleaning the house, dealing with the innumerable visitors who come all through the day, answering the phone, keeping patience and acting intelligently, which is to find some meaning in all that happens — these things, too, are the works of peace, and often seem like a very little way.”
— Dorothy Day, On Pilgrimage, December 1965

Quotes from Thomas Merton

There is no explanation of most of what goes on in our own hearts

“The heart of man can be full of so much pain, even when things are exteriorly all right”. It becomes all the more difficult because today we are used to thinking that there are explanations for everything. But there is no explanation of most of what goes on in our own hearts, and we cannot account for it all. No use resorting to the kind of mental tranquillizers that even religious explanations sometimes offer. Faith must be deeper than that, rooted in the unknown and in the abyss of darkness that is the ground of our being. No use teasing the darkness to try to make answers grow out of it. But if we learn how to have a deep inner patience, things solve themselves, or God solves them if you prefer: but do not expect to see how. Just learn to wait, and do what you can and help other people. Often it is in helping someone else we find the best way to bear our own trouble.” — Thomas Merton from his Christmas letter, 1966

Where we are all going?

…. “I am sick up to the teeth and beyond the teeth, up to the eyes and beyond the eyes, with all forms of projects and expectations and statements and programs and explanations of anything, especially explanations about where we are all going, because where we are all going is where we went a long time ago, over the falls. We are in a new river and we don’t know it.”
(extract from a letter from Thomas Merton to Daniel Berrigan)

Violence embedded in culture itself

“The real focus of American violence is not in esoteric groups but in the very culture itself, its mass media, its extreme individualism and competitiveness, its inflated myths of virility and toughness, and its overwhelming preoccupation with the power of nuclear, chemical, bacteriological, and psychological overkill. If we live in what is essentially a culture of overkill, how can we be surprised at finding violence in it? Can we get to the root of the trouble? In my opinion, the best way to do it would have been the classic way of religious humanism and non-violence exemplified by Gandhi. That way seems now to have been closed. I do not find the future reassuring,” — Thomas Merton edited with an introduction by Gordon C. Zahn (Boston, MA: McCall’s Publishing Company, 1971), p. 230

If you want to study modern history

If you want to study the social and political history of modern nations, study hell.-- Thomas Merton New Seeds of Contemplation, ch 17

worshiping the false self in place of God

“After all, what is your personal identity? It is what you really are, your real self. None of us is what he thinks he is, or what other people think he is, still less what his passport says he is… And it is fortunate for most of us that we are mistaken. We do not generally know what is good for us. That is because, in St. Bernard’s language, our true personality has been concealed under the ‘disguise’ of a false self, the ego, whom we tend to worship in place of God.” —Thomas Merton, The Waters of Siloe
Harcourt & Brace, 1949, p. 349

silence between words

“For language to have meaning, there must be intervals of silence somewhere, to divide word from word and utterance from utterance. He who retires into silence does not necessarily hate language. Perhaps it is love and respect for language which imposes silence upon him. For the mercy of God is not heard in words unless it is heard, both before and after the words are spoken, in silence,”
—Thomas Merton, “Philosophy of Silence,” in Disputed Questions
(NY: Farrar, Straus & Cudahy, 1960), p. 181

Quotes from Martin Luther King Jr

America, you must be born again

“A nation that will keep people in slavery for 244 years will “thingify” them—make them things. Therefore they will exploit them, and poor people generally, economically. And a nation that will exploit economically will have foreign investments and everything else, and will have to use its military to protect them. All of these problems are tied together. What I am saying today is that we must go from this convention and say, ‘America, you must be born again!’” – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Change

“Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle.”

Poor in the Military

“Perhaps a more tragic recognition of reality took place when it became clear to me that the war was doing far more than devastating the hopes of the poor at home. It was sending their sons and their brothers and their husbands to fight and to die in extraordinarily high proportions relative to the rest of the population. We were taking the black young men who had been crippled by our society and sending them eight thousand miles away to guarantee liberties in Southeast Asia which they had not found in southwest Georgia and East Harlem. And so we have been repeatedly faced with the cruel irony of watching Negro and white boys on TV screens as they kill and die together for a nation that has been unable to seat them together in the same schools. And so we watch them in brutal solidarity burning the huts of a poor village, but we realize that they would hardly live on the same block in Chicago. I could not be silent in the face of such cruel manipulation of the poor.” Martin Luther King Jr., Beyond Vietnam — A Time to Break Silence

Quotes on Conscience

Priority of Conscience

“And it is my conscience that compels me to say publicly that the exclusion of women from the priesthood is agrave injustice against women, against our Church and against our God who calls both men and women to the priesthood.” Fr. Roy Bourgeois in his letter to Maryknoll why he could not recant his belief and public statements that support the ordination of women.

“Over the pope … there still stands one’s own conscience, which must be obeyed before all else, if necessary, even against the requirement of ecclesiastical authority.” Archbishop Joseph Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI,in his 1968 commentary on the Second Vatican Council’s document, Gaudium et Spes.

Nonviolence or Militarism

Breaking the Silence

Teach War No More

Marquette University, Be Faithful to the Gospel,and No Longer Host Departments of Military Science.

Marquette and Notre Dame Teach War and Killing

No More War Spending

Military Spending Voting Records of Rep. Paul Ryan [R]and Rep.Gwen Moore [D] of Wisconsin from 2005 – 20012.

Free Palestine

Cost of War in $

Spirituality of Nonviolence

Catholic Workers and Military Training on Catholic Campuses

Conversation Between St. Ignatius of Loyola and Mahatma Gandhi


Featured article

Killing by Committee in the Global Wild West


Common Dreams
Published on Monday, July 13, 2015 by TomDispatch

The Perpetrators Become the Victims of Drone Warfare

by Pratap Chatterjee

The myth of the lone drone warrior is now well established and threatens to become as enduring as that of the lone lawman with a white horse and a silver bullet who rode out into the Wild West to find the bad guys. In a similar fashion, the unsung hero of Washington’s modern War on Terror in the wild backlands of the planet is sometimes portrayed as a mysterious Central Intelligence Agency officer. Via modern technology, he prowls Central Asian or Middle Eastern skies with his unmanned Predator drone, dispatching carefully placed Hellfire missiles to kill top al-Qaeda terrorists in their remote hideouts.

So much for the myth. In reality, there’s nothing “lone” about drone warfare. Think of the structure for carrying out Washington’s drone killing program as a multidimensional pyramid populated with hundreds of personnel and so complex that just about no one involved really grasps the full picture. Cian Westmoreland, a U.S. Air Force veteran who helped set up the drone data communications system over southeastern Afghanistan back in 2009, puts the matter bluntly: “There are so many people in the chain of actions that it has become increasingly difficult to understand the true impact of what we do. The diffusion of responsibility distances people from the moral weight of their decisions.”

In addition, it’s a program under pressure, killing continually, and losing its own personnel at a startling and possibly unsustainable rate due to “wounds” that no one ever imagined as part of this war. There are, in fact, two groups feeling the greatest impact from Washington’s ongoing air campaigns: lowly drone intelligence “analysts,” often fresh out of high school, and women and children living in poverty on the other side of the world.



Various quotes


Phil Berrigan


“Since war itself is the most extreme form of terrorism, a war on terrorism is profoundly self-contradictory.” -Howard Zinn

“Whoever works righteousness, man or woman, and has faith, verily, to them will We give a life that is good and pure, and We will bestow on them their reward according to the best of their actions.” Quran 16:97

“In the Catholic Worker we must try to have the voluntary poverty of St. Francis, the charity of St. Vincent de Paul, the intellectual approach of St. Dominic, the easy conversations about things that matter of St. Philip Neri, the manual labor of St. Benedict.” - Peter Maurin, co-founder of the Catholic Worker movement

Pictures And Quotes





Inconvenient Facts And Pictures


Jokes and Editorial Cartoons


Jokes


Editorial Cartoons


Neuroscience

Restoring the Senses, Gardening and Orthodox Easter
MAPS

Woman’s Ordination

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